LRIP

UN Keep Sanctions over Afghan, But Soften their Policy

September 3, 2021

The UNSC has quietly removed the word “Taliban” from its remarks naming the organizations that are not permitted to support terrorists operating from Afghanistan. The Security Council issued a statement on August 16 “restating the significance of countering terrorism in” and guaranteeing that Afghan territory “is not used to endanger or attack any country.”

According to the comment, “neither the Taliban nor any other Afghan group or individual should sponsor terrorism functioning on the land of any other country.” On August 27, a day after the Kabul airport bombings, the UN Security Council reprinted a line of text from its previous statement but omitted the word Taliban.

“The Security Council members reaffirmed the significance of countering terrorism in Afghanistan to make sure that the land of Afghanistan is not used to endanger or attack any country, and that no Afghan group or individual should sponsor terrorism functioning on the land of any country,” the revised paragraph stated. On August 30, the Security Council issued statement in response to the Kabul bombings, which died more than 180 people, including 13 US service members and 28 Taliban.

The text once more considered for Afghanistan to be “not used to threaten or attack any country, or to shelter or train terrorists, or to plan or finance terrorist acts,” but it did not name the Taliban as one of the groups needed to do so. The council could have done so because the Taliban is still mentioned as a terror organization in UN Security Council Resolution 1267 from 1999.

The resolution placed sanctions on the Taliban and seized their funds and other financial capacity because they provided safe haven for Osama bin Laden, who was desired at the time for the 1998 bombings of US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.

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